Deze piloot maakt adembenemend mooie foto’s

by CasaPantalones

Chirstiaan van Heijst is naast piloot ook fotograaf en dat blijkt dé perfecte combinatie te zijn voor het maken van de meest adembenemende foto’s! De Nederlander wist al op jonge leeftijd dat hij piloot wilde worden, hij haalde eerder zijn vliegbrevet dan rijbewijs, en vliegt tegenwoordig in een Boeing 747 vrachtvliegtuig..

Fotograaf & Piloot is machtig mooie combinatie

Het begon bij Christiaan allemaal met een passie voor fotograferen en werd uiteindelijk een uit de hand gelopen hobby. Inmiddels heeft hij ruim 90k aan volgers op Instagram en was zijn werk al te zien op andere CNN, BBC en NatGeo. Wat een toffe baan hebben piloten toch ook! Ga deze man zeker even volgen!

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Flying in and out of Afghanistan can be a challenging endeavour any day, but when the weather turns bad with heavy snow, fog and clouds it is even more so. During my last flight into Kabul we flew in heavy clouds and snow showers all the way down to the runway in the darkest hour of the night. The radio altimeter counting down the distance between us and the ground with not a single recognizable feature to be noticed in the grey void outside my windows, mountains rushing by past our wings without being able to notice or see them at all. Only mere moments before we had to break off our approach, the runway lights glowed faintly through the thick snow and mist while billions of snowflakes were rushing by my windows. Just in time. Runway in sight; cleared to land. On our way out after sunrise, we flew along one of the airways that I used to fly on the Fokker 50 about 10 years ago when I flew here in Afghanistan, just a few thousand feet higher this time. The same valleys, mountains and canyons floated by; I recognize the same peaks and landmarks along the way and I realise that this country has not changed at all. No matter how many armies and governments have tried to rule over this rough spot on the world map, the undisturbed landscape has been the same for thousands of years and will likely be the same for ages to come. From the first day I flew those domestic routes across the country, I told myself that I would love to travel across this country by car one day and enjoy these impressive sceneries from below. Unfortunately the situation in Afghanistan has deteriorated ever since and is not expected to improve any time soon. Who knows, one day. When reason returns to the Hindu Kush and it's people can live in peace again. jpcvanheijst.com #afghanistan #landscape #landscapephotography #landscapes #landscape_lovers #winter #winterwonderland #avgeek #aviation #flying #aerial #pilot #pilotlife #pilotview @afghanistan_you_never_see

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I guess most aviation-geeks have no trouble recognizing this airport at first glance; the old airport of Quito. Or as it was officially named; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Ecuador, South America. Defunct since 2013, it earned a notorious reputation among pilots in the 53 years it was opened. Having claimed many lives and airplanes that either slipped off the runway, flew into buildings and residential areas or ended their flight on the side of a mountain, the airport was known as one of the most dangerous airports in the world. Towering mountains and active volcanoes of over 20.000ft, hiding in clouds or in plain sight around the city can end a flight prematurely and are dangerous enough by themselves, but if the winds are powerful enough to push their way over the Andes, the resulting turbulence, mountain waves and invisible windshear can prove fatal for any trespasser. Here, blue skies are the tell-tale sign of caution. Far above sea level, the airport is at the very limit of what modern jet aircraft can operate into. The effectiveness of engines, wings and control surfaces depends on the mass of air flow and at 10.000ft the mass of air is greatly reduced. To still be able to fly and steer, the airspeed needs to be about 20% higher and this in effect results in a much larger turn-radius in the tight valley, less thrust from engines, less terrain clearance, high landing speeds, longer stopping distance and easily overheated brakes. Not to speak of the extremely crowded airspace with fast-paced unintelligible South-American Spanish chatter on the radio or non-normal situations like losing an engine, loss of hydraulics or cabin pressure that can quickly turn a relatively simple failure into a fast-developing complex emergency with no pause-button. Before flying into Quito a thorough simulator training had to be done, preparing us at least partially for the unique challenges of flying here and what to do and consider if luck was not on our side. I'm glad I have flown to this illustrious airport a handful of times, adding another notable marker on the world map in my study room and unique entry in my logbook. #avgeek #aviation #airport #quito

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Now that was quite a halloween night! When we departed from Caracas, weather reports indicated there was some rain and wind expected around our time of arrival in Houston, but nothing prepared us for what we would find upon our arrival. Every new inflight weather-update showed us the situation was getting worse and worse; a quickly intensifying squall line of heavy thunderstorms was building up over Texas and slowly moved east. Extreme precipitation, flooded runways, intense lightning activity, tornado warning, heavy wind gusts of up to 45kts/80kmh.. enough to postpone our approach and make up our minds on the options we had. With the extra fuel we took from Caracas, we were able to wait out the worst of the weather, instead of making a precautionary landing in New Orleans and run out of duty hours. Coming close to Texas, the constant lightning flashes began to appear on the horizon and our weather radar soon showed a long yellow, red & purple mass, indicating how intense the weather activity actually was. There is no way we could land in that kind of weather, so we flew around the worst of it, all the way down to Corpus Christi, close to the Mexican border, before we could turn back east towards the airport. Adding another 350Nm/700km to our night. But we're not fair-weather pilots and our fuel reserves won't last forever, so we had to attempt an approach at one point when the worst of the weather was gone. As one of the first airplanes to give it a try, our 747 was tossed around in the heavy turbulence and rain as we tried to find our way to the localizer of runway 26L. Finally: the runway lights became vaguely distinguishable ahead through the rain. I felt more like driving a submarine than an airplane; the windshield wipers were working overtime but were pretty much pointless with this amount of water. There we go.. glide slope captured. Gear down, flaps in landing configuration, landing checklist completed and the wipers moving their fast relentless pace. 1000ft.. 500ft.. 200ft.. wind steady; 30 knots gusting wind directly from the right side. The whole machine is on a significant angle…. (continued below)

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Ook interessant

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